Pathways to Work 2: Ministry Curriculum


About this Program


Ministry Curriculum for the Supply Chain

NOC

OCCUPATION

1241

Administrative Assistant

1411

General Office Clerk

1414

Receptionist

1453

Customer Service

1525

Dispatchers & Radio Operators (formerly 1475)

6421

Retail Sales

6552

Other Customer Service

6651

Security Guard

*NOC = National Occupation Code

 

Pathways to Work 2: Ministry Curriculum

This is a sector-related credit program that offers an alternative pathway to gaining:

    Essential Workplace Skills

    Specialized Skills and Knowledge

    Industry-recognized Health & Safety Certifications

    Secondary School Credits

    an Ontario Secondary School Diploma or

    a Secondary School Certificate or a Certificate of Accomplishment

 

 

·  The Minister of Education awards Diplomas and Certificates to students based on recommendation from the Principal

 

·  Ask about Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) for Mature Students

 

 

 

Pathways to Work in the Supply Chain

- Ministry Curriculum -

  • Each term takes 9 weeks to complete
  • Complete up to 2 credits per term
  • The number of terms required to gain NOC-specific skills is based on assessment
  • Each course has specific expectations that align with NOC requirements
  • Check the Business Curriculum for Course Descriptions
* ICT = Information & Communication Technology
Office Administration
NOC(s): 1241, 1411
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BBI2O
Introduction to Business
Open
None
BTT2O
ICT* in Business
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
BTA3O
ICT*: The Digital Environment
Open
None
BTX4E
ICT* in the Workplace
Employment
BTA3O
BOG4E
Business Leadership: Becoming a Manager
Employment
None
Receptionist
NOC(s): 1411
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BBI2O
Introduction to Business
Open
None
BTT2O
ICT* in Business
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
BTA3O
ICT*: The Digital Environment
Open
None
Retail Sales
NOC(s): 6421, 6611, 6623
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BTT2O
ICT* in Business
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
Customer Service - Other
NOC(s): 6552
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BTT2O
ICT* in Business
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
Customer Service
NOC(s): 1453
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BBI2O
Introduction to Business
Open
None
BTT2O
ICT* in Business
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
BTA3O
ICT*: The Digital Environment
Open
None
Security Guard
NOC(s): 6651, 6541
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BTA3O
ICT*: The Digital Environment
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
GLN4O
Navigating the Workplace
Open
None
 Dispatcher
NOC(s):1525, 1475
Code
Title
Type
Prerequisite(s)
BTA3O
ICT*: The Digital Environment
Open
None
BMX3E
Marketing: Retail & Service
Employment
None
BOG4E
Business Leadership: Becoming a Manager
Employment
None
BBB4E
International Business Essentials
Employment
None
GLN4O
Navigating the Workplace
Open
None
Health & Safety Certificates
During the program, students will have the opportunity to earn the industry-recognized Health & Safety Certificates. The following are some of the certificates that are available:

   WHMIS
   First Aid & CPR 
   Accessible Customer Service
   Mental Health Awareness
   Violence in the Workplace Awareness
   Health & Safety Awareness for Ontario Workers
   Slips, Trips, and Falls
   Manual Material Handling and Back Safety
   Ladder Safety
    Musculoskeletal Disorders




 
2016-2017 Schedule
TERM
START DATE
END DATE
1
September 6, 2016
November 8, 2016
2
November 14, 2016
January 26, 2017
3
January 30, 2017
April 7, 2017
4
April 10, 2017
June 13, 2017
5
June 19, 2017
August 22, 2017
 



Call (519) 766-1477 to Register





INFORMATION ABOUT THE BUSINESS CURRICULUM


Pathways has selected business courses from the following course types:



Workplace Preparation:

Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to enter the workplace directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs.



Open Courses

Open courses are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and to prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of universities, colleges, or the workplace in mind. 



The courses we have bundled together for the Pathways to Work program include:

 BBI10/20 - Introduction to Business
 BTT10/20 - Information and Communication Technology in Business
 BMX3E - Marketing: Retail Sales and Service
 BTA3O - Information and Communication Technology: The Digital Environment
 BOG4E - Leadership in Business: Becoming a Manager
 BTX4E - Information and Communication Technology in the Workplace


The curriculum information that follows has been taken from:
 
Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10 
Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12 



Topics from "Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum" included here:
  1. The Goals of Business Studies; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 4
  2. Five Critical Areas of Learning in All Business Studies Courses; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 5
  3. Planning Business Studies Programs for Students With Special Education Needs - Accommodations; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 22
  4. English As a Second Language and English Literacy Development (ESL/ELD); Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 23
  5. Literacy, Numeracy, and Inquiry/Research Skills; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 25
  6. The Ontario Skills Passport and Essential Skills; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 25
  7. Career Education; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 26
  8. Planning Program Pathways and Programs Leading to a Specialist High-Skills Major, Apprenticeship, or Workplace Destination; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 27
  9. Health and Safety in Business Studies; Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, pg. 27 


The Goals of Business Studies:

 The goals of the business studies curriculum are to enable students to:

  • gain an understanding of business concepts through the study of subjects such as accounting, entrepreneurship, information and communication technology (ICT), international business, marketing, and business leadership;
  • achieve business, economic, financial, and digital literacy;1
  • develop the skills, including critical thinking skills, and strategies required to conduct research and inquiry and communicate findings accurately, ethically, and effectively;
  • apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired through the study of business to a variety of learning tasks and relate them to business phenomena on the local, national, and global levels;
  • develop lifelong learning skills that will help them adapt to technological advancements, the changing workplace, and the global economy;
  • make connections that will help them take advantage of potential postsecondary educational, work, and business opportunities.

 These goals can be achieved in a concrete and practical context through real-world learning activities that combine the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills.


Five Critical Areas of Learning in All Business Studies Courses

The business studies curriculum in Grades 9 to 12 offers a range of courses, all built on the belief that effective learning in all subjects of the discipline depends on the development of knowledge and skills in five critical areas: business skills; communication in a business environment; digital literacy; financial literacy; and ethical, moral, and legal considerations in business.

The business studies program comprises a set of interrelated courses that extend and deepen students’ understanding and skills in these critical areas as they progress through the grades, enabling them to apply the relevant concepts and skills with increasing sophistication to a broad range of business-related issues and problems. Recognizing linkages between these five areas of study strengthens students’ understanding of theory and successful practice in the world of business.

Although the specific content of courses changes from subject to subject and grade to grade, the focus on the five critical areas remains consistent throughout the business studies curriculum, from Grade 9 to Grade 12, and lends continuity to student learning.

Each of the five critical areas of learning is associated with related areas of knowledge and skills, as outlined in the following table.

Critical areas of learning:

Business skills: Knowledge and skills necessary for success in business.

  • problem solving
  • critical and creative thinking
  • employability skills
  • applications software
  • financial planning
  • entrepreneurial skills
  • leadership
  • organizational productivity
  • risk management
  • teamwork
  • strategic planning
  • business etiquette
  • research and inquiry


Communication in a business environment:
Methods, technology, and standards involved in communication within and between businesses (including the use of appropriate terminology, established formats, and state-of-the-art technology).

  • literacy skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, representing
  • business terminology
  • delivery of presentations
  • formatting of documents
  • global awareness
  • etiquette and protocols in electronic communicationsconflict resolution

 

Digital literacy: The ability to use digital technology, communications tools, and/or networks to access, understand, manage, integrate, evaluate, and create information.
  • terminology related to ICT
  • information systems and structures
  • fundamentals of operating systems and computer hardware
  • data management
  • use of various software applications
  • web and other electronic design
  • integrated technologies
  • multimedia tools
  • security related to ICT


Financial literacy:
The ability to read, analyse, manage, and communicate financial information for personal and professional purposes.

  • money management
  • fundamentals of economics
  • numeracy skills
  • credit
  • financial decision making
  • analysis of financial documents
  • investment
  • taxation


Ethical, moral, and legal considerations in business:
The understanding and/or determination of social and environ- mental consequences of business practices on the local, national, and global levels.

  • principles and guidelines for ethical business practice
  • privacy issues
  • social responsibility
  • equity and diversity
  • professional standards
  • responsibility for environmental consequences and sustainability
  • accountability
  • intellectual property


Planning Business Studies Programs for Students With Special Education Needs: Accommodations

Students Requiring Accommodations. With the aid of accommodations alone, some students are able to participate in the regular course curriculum and to demonstrate learning independently. (Accommodations do not alter the provincial curriculum expectations for the course.) The accommodations required to facilitate the student’s learning must be identified in his or her IEP (see IEP Standards, 2000 , page 11). A student’s IEP is likely to reflect the same accommodations for many, or all, courses.

There are three types of accommodations. Instructional accommodations are changes in teaching strategies, including styles of presentation, methods of organization, or use of technology and multimedia. Environmental accommodations are changes that the student may require in the class- room and/or school environment, such as preferential seating or special lighting. Assessment accommodations are changes in assessment procedures that enable the student to demonstrate his or her learning, such as allowing additional time to complete tests or assignments or per- mitting oral responses to test questions (see page 29 of the IEP Resource Guide, 2004 , for more examples).

If a student requires “accommodations only” in business studies courses, assessment and evaluation of his or her achievement will be based on the appropriate course curriculum expectations and the achievement levels outlined in this document. The IEP box on the Provincial Report Card will not be checked, and no information on the provision of accommodations will be included.


English As a Second Language and English Literacy Development (ESL/ELD)

Young people whose first language is not English enter Ontario secondary schools with diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Some may have experience of highly sophisticated educational systems, while others may have had limited formal schooling. All of these students bring a rich array of background knowledge and experience to the classroom, and all teachers must share in the responsibility for their English-language development.

Students who come to Ontario from other countries will find the study of the subjects within business studies particularly useful. Through this study, they can develop an understanding of the Canadian business environment that will help them to become well-informed Canadian citizens.

Business studies courses can provide interesting learning opportunities for students who have come to Canada from different countries. Because business seeks ways to address the needs of diverse markets and communities, students from other countries may find that their experiences and background are helpful in analysing the needs of various markets and determining appropriate business strategies. In addition, because businesses require employees with a wide range of skills and abilities, students will learn how their backgrounds and language skills can contribute to business success.

Teachers of business studies must incorporate appropriate strategies for instruction and assessment to facilitate the success of the English language learners in their classrooms. These strategies include:

  • modification of some or all of the course expectations, based on the student’s level of English proficiency; (Only publicly-funded schools can modify course expectations)
  • use of a variety of instructional strategies (e.g., extensive use of visual cues, graphic organizers, scaffolding; previewing of textbooks; pre-teaching of key vocabulary; peer tutoring; strategic use of students’ first languages);
  • use of a variety of learning resources (e.g., visual material, simplified text, bilingual dictionaries, and culturally diverse materials);
  • use of assessment accommodations (e.g., granting of extra time; use of oral interviews and tasks requiring completion of graphic organizers and cloze sentences instead of essay questions and other assessment tasks that depend heavily on proficiency in English).
Students who are no longer taking ESL or ELD courses may still require program adaptations to be successful. When learning expectations in a course other than ESL and ELD are modified, this must be clearly indicated on the student’s report card by checking the ESL or ELD box. (See the Guide to the Provincial Report Card, Grades 9–12, 1999.)  For further information on supporting students who are English language learners, refer to The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 12: English As a Second Language and English Literacy Development, 1999 and the resource guide Many Roots, Many Voices: Supporting English Language Learners in Every Classroom (Ministry of Education, 2005).


Health and Safety in Business Studies

The business studies program provides for exploration of a variety of concepts relating to health and safety in the workplace. In planning learning activities to help students achieve the curriculum expectations, teachers need to ensure that students have opportunities to consider health and safety issues. Health and safety issues must be addressed when learning involves cooperative education and other workplace experiences. Teachers who provide support for students in workplace learning placements need to assess placements for safety and ensure students understand the importance of issues relating to health and safety in the workplace. Before taking part in workplace learning experiences, students must acquire the knowledge and skills needed for safe participation. Students must understand their rights to privacy and confidentiality as outlined in the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. They have the right to function in an environment free from abuse and harassment, and they need to be aware of harassment and abuse issues in establishing boundaries for their own personal safety. They should be informed about school and community resources and school policies and reporting procedures with respect to all forms of abuse and harassment.

Policy/Program Memorandum No. 76A,“Workplace Safety and Insurance Coverage for Students in Work Education Programs” (September 2000), outlines procedures for ensuring the provision of Health and Safety Insurance Board coverage for students who are at least 14 years of age and are on placements of more than one day. (A one-day job shadowing or job twinning experience is treated as a field trip.)Teachers should also be aware of the minimum age requirements outlined in the Occupational Health and Safety Act for persons to be in or to be working in specific workplace settings. Relevant ministry policies are outlined in Cooperative Education and Other Forms of Experiential Learning: Policies and Procedures for Ontario Secondary Schools, 2000.

 

Planning Program Pathways and Programs Leading to a Specialist High-Skills Major, Apprenticeship, or Workplace Destination

Business studies courses are well suited for inclusion in programs leading to a Specialist High- Skills Major (SHSM) or in programs designed to provide pathways to particular apprenticeship or workplace destinations. In an SHSM program, business studies courses can be bundled with other courses to provide the academic knowledge and skills important to particular industry sectors and required for success in the workplace and postsecondary education, including apprenticeship. Business studies courses may also be combined with cooperative education credits to provide the workplace experience required for SHSM programs and for various program pathways to apprenticeship and workplace destinations. (SHSM programs would also include sector-specific learning opportunities offered by employers, skills-training centres, colleges, and community organizations.)

 

Career Education

Most careers involve some aspect of business practice – physicians and mechanics operate small businesses, artists sell their art. Courses in business studies prepare students for employment in such diverse areas as retailing, management, technology, small business, government service, and professional careers. The skills and knowledge that students acquire through business studies courses are essential for a wide range of careers. Students gain an understanding of various aspects of business operation and practice through courses in all the subjects in the discipline. In addition, the focus on personal management, interpersonal skills, and career development in the business studies curriculum will help prepare students for success in their working lives, whatever their career. Finally, learning about different kinds of businesses will enable students who are interested in a career in business to think about the type of operation that is best suited to their backgrounds and interests.


The Ontario Skills Passport and Essential Skills

Teachers planning programs in business studies need to be aware of the purpose and benefits of the Ontario Skills Passport (OSP).The OSP is a bilingual web-based resource that enhances the relevancy of classroom learning for students and strengthens school–work connections. The OSP provides clear descriptions of essential skills such as reading, writing, use of computers, measurement and calculation, and problem solving and includes an extensive database of occupation-specific workplace tasks that illustrate how workers use these skills on the job. The essential skills are transferable, in that they are used in virtually all occupations. The OSP also includes descriptions of important work habits, such as working safely, being reliable, and providing excellent customer service. The OSP is designed to help employers assess and record students’ demonstration of these skills and work habits during their cooperative-education placements. Students can use the OSP to identify the skills and work habits they already have, plan further skill development, and show employers what they can do.

The skills described in the OSP are the essential skills that the Government of Canada and other national and international agencies have identified and validated, through extensive research, as the skills needed for work, learning, and life. Essential skills provide the foundation for learning all other skills and enable people to evolve with their jobs and adapt to workplace change. For further information on the OSP and essential skills, visit: http://skills.edu.gov.on.ca.

 

Literacy, Numeracy, and Inquiry/Research Skills

Success in all their secondary school courses depends in large part on students’ literacy skills. The activities and tasks that students undertake in the business studies curriculum involve oral, written, and visual communication skills. For example, students use language to record their observations, to describe their inquiries in both informal and formal contexts, and to present their findings in presentations and reports in oral, written, graphic, and multimedia forms. Communicating in a business environment and using business software require the use and understanding of specialized terminology. In all business studies courses, students are required to use appropriate and correct terminology, and are encouraged to use language with care and precision, in order to communicate effectively.

The Ministry of Education has facilitated the development of materials to support literacy instruction across the curriculum. Helpful advice for integrating literacy instruction in business studies courses may be found in the following resource documents:

Think Literacy: Cross-CurricularApproaches,Grades7–12,2003
Think Literacy: Cross-Curricular Approaches–Subject Specific Examples: Business Studies, Grades 9–10, 2004

The business studies curriculum also builds on and reinforces certain aspects of the mathematics curriculum. For example, clear, concise communication involves the use of various diagrams, charts, tables, and graphs to organize, interpret, and present information.

In business studies courses, students will develop their ability to ask questions and conduct research as they plan and manage projects. They need to learn a variety of research methods in order to carry out their investigations, and to know which methods to use in a particular inquiry. Students need to learn how to locate relevant information in a variety of print and electronic sources, including books and articles, manuals, newspapers, websites, databases, tables, diagrams, and charts. As they advance through the grades, students will be expected to use these sources with increasing sophistication. They will also be expected to distinguish between primary and secondary sources, to determine their validity and relevance, and to use them in appropriate ways. This is especially true with respect to electronic research sources.